[Infographic]: The Evolution of the Tablet PC

The development of the tablet PC has caused a revolution in the worlds of commerce and enterprise, a huge shift in how we communicate and connect with one another. If you were to say that the release of the iPad – and the flood of devices that hit the market immediately afterward – has changed the world, you wouldn’t be that far off. If you were to posit that they’ll continue to do so for the foreseeable future, well…

I doubt you’ll find many who would disagree with you.

Believe it or not, the iPad – the device that started it all – didn’t actually incorporate a great deal of new hardware, nor was it an entirely new concept. It wasn’t the technology so much as it was Apple’s approach along with Steve Jobs’ brilliant marketing that made the iPad the latest “must-have” device. It was a perfect storm of old ideas cobbled together in a new and innovative fashion. Today’s infographic takes a look at where the Tablet came from.

Titled “The Evolution of the Tablet PC,” it takes the form of a timeline stretching all the way back to 1987 – the year of the first tablet, called Z88, and ends in 2011; the year when the iPad 2 was released. There’s not much else to say here – it’s an interesting look into the past, and by reading the graphic, one can actually piece together a fairly decent idea of where Apple came from with the iPad.

The infographic can be found below, and you can click for a larger version of it.

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[Infographic]: Objects on Demand – The Rise of the 3D Printing Revolution

There’s been a shift in the manufacturing core with the birth of 3D printers. People suddenly have the supplies – and the capacity- to manufacture their own goods, to some degree. Granted, we’re still not seeing the average user have access to industrial-level manufacturing capacity – it’s not going to change the world that much – but it’s still a revolution, of a kind.

We’re still seeing users with access to a manufacturing procedure – and capabilities – that even ten years ago we could only dream of. As the technology advances in complexity and market penetration, I wouldn’t be the least bit surprised to see people cobbling together their own high-quality action figures, among other things.

The degree to which 3D printers have changed the world – and the potential they have to change it further – isn’t something that should be ignored. The birth, development, and impact of 3D printing is the topic of today’s infographic. Fittingly, it’s titled “Objects on Demand: The Rise of the 3D Printing Revolution.”

“Every so often,” the infographic reads, “a technology comes along which disrupts the entire world in a profound way. Think of the internal combustion engine, the personal computer, the smartphone, and now 3D printing. This innovation allows users to cheaply, quickly, and efficiently produce three-dimensional objects straight from their computer. The possibilities of this technology are endless, and early adopters are already putting it to creative use.”

The graphic purports to explore the way 3D printing works, how the market is expected to grow, and the industries upon which it’s slated to have the most marked impact. The infographic can be found below, and as always, clicking on it will take you to a larger, more readable version. I’ll see you fine folks next time.

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How Much Energy Does It Take To Power The Cloud? [Infographic]

As most of you have probably heard by now, the New York Time’s piece on data centers wasn’t exactly accurate. And more than a little intellectually dishonest, to boot. In spite of that, it did raise one very, very good point..

There is no such thing as the cloud. There is no such thing as data that exists solely in virtual space. There’s always a physical backbone somewhere, there’s always some sort of infrastructure supporting ‘cloud’ operations.

Given how big cloud computing’s gotten and how vital the Internet has become to everyone, well…

That’s a lot of hardware.

Of  course, that hardware needs power, as well – and it draws a considerable amount in order to keep itself running. Data centers in the United States alone are responsible for about 2% of global carbon emissions annually, and they draw enough electricity to power 25,000 houses, to boot. A staggering volume of energy and pollution – perhaps not so dire as the New York Times made it out to be, but still a cause for some concern. Particularly since the mammoth facilities have the potential to scarf down even more power and produce as much as 350 megatons of CO2 by 2020, if left unchecked.

Thankfully, data center operators across the world are aware of this, and have for quite some time been taking steps to address the issue of energy efficiency and environmental friendliness. It’s why green computing has become such a big thing lately.

Our infographic today examines the green computing craze side-by-side with the global impact of the cloud on our environment, energy infrastructure, and society. Power’s the main concern here – it is called “powering the cloud” after all – but it’s still got some decent information on efficient computing, coupled with a few rather nifty stats. You can view the infographic below. As always, click to enlarge.

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[Infographic]: The Evolution of the Tablet PC

The development of the tablet PC has caused a revolution in the worlds of commerce and enterprise, a huge shift in how we communicate and connect with one another. If you were to say that the release of the iPad – and the flood of devices that hit the market immediately afterward – has changed the world, you wouldn’t be that far off. If you were to posit that they’ll continue to do so for the foreseeable future, well…

I doubt you’ll find many who would disagree with you.

Believe it or not, the iPad – the device that started it all – didn’t actually incorporate a great deal of new hardware, nor was it an entirely new concept. It wasn’t the technology so much as it was Apple’s approach along with Steve Jobs’ brilliant marketing that made the iPad the latest “must-have” device. It was a perfect storm of old ideas cobbled together in a new and innovative fashion. Today’s infographic takes a look at where the Tablet came from.

Titled “The Evolution of the Tablet PC,” it takes the form of a timeline stretching all the way back to 1987 – the year of the first tablet, called Z88, and ends in 2011; the year when the iPad 2 was released. There’s not much else to say here – it’s an interesting look into the past, and by reading the graphic, one can actually piece together a fairly decent idea of where Apple came from with the iPad.

The infographic can be found below, and you can click for a larger version of it.

Free eBook!

If so, please join over 28,000 people who receive our exclusive weekly newsletter and computer tips, and get FREE COPIES of 5 eBooks we created, as our gift to you for subscribing. Just enter your name and email below:

How Much Energy Does It Take To Power The Cloud? [Infographic]

As most of you have probably heard by now, the New York Time’s piece on data centers wasn’t exactly accurate. And more than a little intellectually dishonest, to boot. In spite of that, it did raise one very, very good point..

There is no such thing as the cloud. There is no such thing as data that exists solely in virtual space. There’s always a physical backbone somewhere, there’s always some sort of infrastructure supporting ‘cloud’ operations.

Given how big cloud computing’s gotten and how vital the Internet has become to everyone, well…

That’s a lot of hardware.

Of  course, that hardware needs power, as well – and it draws a considerable amount in order to keep itself running. Data centers in the United States alone are responsible for about 2% of global carbon emissions annually, and they draw enough electricity to power 25,000 houses, to boot. A staggering volume of energy and pollution – perhaps not so dire as the New York Times made it out to be, but still a cause for some concern. Particularly since the mammoth facilities have the potential to scarf down even more power and produce as much as 350 megatons of CO2 by 2020, if left unchecked.

Thankfully, data center operators across the world are aware of this, and have for quite some time been taking steps to address the issue of energy efficiency and environmental friendliness. It’s why green computing has become such a big thing lately.

Our infographic today examines the green computing craze side-by-side with the global impact of the cloud on our environment, energy infrastructure, and society. Power’s the main concern here – it is called “powering the cloud” after all – but it’s still got some decent information on efficient computing, coupled with a few rather nifty stats. You can view the infographic below. As always, click to enlarge.

Free eBook!

If so, please join over 28,000 people who receive our exclusive weekly newsletter and computer tips, and get FREE COPIES of 5 eBooks we created, as our gift to you for subscribing. Just enter your name and email below:

[Infographic]: Objects on Demand – The Rise of the 3D Printing Revolution

There’s been a shift in the manufacturing core with the birth of 3D printers. People suddenly have the supplies – and the capacity- to manufacture their own goods, to some degree. Granted, we’re still not seeing the average user have access to industrial-level manufacturing capacity – it’s not going to change the world that much – but it’s still a revolution, of a kind.

We’re still seeing users with access to a manufacturing procedure – and capabilities – that even ten years ago we could only dream of. As the technology advances in complexity and market penetration, I wouldn’t be the least bit surprised to see people cobbling together their own high-quality action figures, among other things.

The degree to which 3D printers have changed the world – and the potential they have to change it further – isn’t something that should be ignored. The birth, development, and impact of 3D printing is the topic of today’s infographic. Fittingly, it’s titled “Objects on Demand: The Rise of the 3D Printing Revolution.”

“Every so often,” the infographic reads, “a technology comes along which disrupts the entire world in a profound way. Think of the internal combustion engine, the personal computer, the smartphone, and now 3D printing. This innovation allows users to cheaply, quickly, and efficiently produce three-dimensional objects straight from their computer. The possibilities of this technology are endless, and early adopters are already putting it to creative use.”

The graphic purports to explore the way 3D printing works, how the market is expected to grow, and the industries upon which it’s slated to have the most marked impact. The infographic can be found below, and as always, clicking on it will take you to a larger, more readable version. I’ll see you fine folks next time.

Free eBook!

If so, please join over 28,000 people who receive our exclusive weekly newsletter and computer tips, and get FREE COPIES of 5 eBooks we created, as our gift to you for subscribing. Just enter your name and email below:

[Infographic]: Cyber thieves that stole Christmas

“Is the most wonderful time of the year,” right? Most out there everyone loves Christmas; If not for consumerism, then for the time with friends and family. It is Christmas time, celebration and gift giving and shopping and delicious, delicious food.

It is also time for identity theft.

Computer graphics today presents some rather worrying statistics in terms of sales, both online and offline. According to the graph, depending on how to buy (online or offline), 70-75% of your personal information might be vulnerable to robbery, either by data breaches, loss of data or interception. It is not even the worst part, either. Even if the seller or the organization which has been violated recognizes that there is a problem, not all are necessarily responsible for: only 21% are really prepared to notify their customers of a violation. Worse; 79% of victims are not actually said about commitment. The only good news is that credit card fraud is only a small percentage of crimes of theft of identity (15%), other forms of fraud it first.

Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent your data from being stolen, if it gets in the hands of an organization neglected with incompetent employees. All he can really do, concludes the infographic is staying alert. Be wary of each site, which you will see that it is not a reputable retailer, known. Constantly monitor your personal information and accustomed to check in yourself so you can be sure that no one is using their data where it should not.

Check your credit card statements. Monitor your accounts. Know exactly how much money you have, and exactly how much is spent. Basically, be diligent and wise – especially if you’re shopping online this holiday season. After all, there are very few hackers who feel that the perfect Christmas gift is your personal information.

Anyway, computer graphics is below. Click to enlarge.

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[Infographic]: how mobile phones have changed media consumption

Today, having a smartphone (or, at least, a cell phone) today is similar to having a TV in the eighties or nineties: everybody just did it and who was not considered “strange”, “backward” or “behind” the times. Especially since the development of the iPad in 2010, mobile devices have become a common fixture in the home. This is, of course, not without a number of consequences.

The first of these is that, along with the Internet, mobility is changing the way of consuming, think and communicate. We use our devices for practically everything, from chat to surf the web to see videos of purchases to the Organization of our day. In turn, this trend is change how we access to means of communication, where we do our navigation, and when sees us and surfing.

At this point, I’m saying you a lot of things that you already know: it is obvious that smartphones and tablets have changed something fundamental about the way to connect with each other. People have been buzzing about him almost from the first day of the fashion of the mobile web.

Computer graphics of today, entitled “5 ways mobile devices way Americans have changed media consumption” quantifies the madness that surrounds the mobile use. Looks in detail at how much time Americans spend on their smartphones and tablets, at what time during the day most people use their devices, and which devices to. Finally, infographics concludes with the influence that have multiple media in customer purchasing decisions – as it turns out, we should not have cable TV out still. Apparently, approximately 57% of surveyed by Inmobi (the organization responsible for computer graphics) said that television exerts the greatest influence on their purchasing decisions.

As always, you can find a compact version of the graphics below, click on larger image.

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[Infographic]: Internet 2012 and mobile trends

Well, friends. That’s it, we’ve reached the end of the line. The last days of the 2012 have finally passed us, and we have advanced in 2013. Now everyone is looking forward – make predictions about the cool new things and new years resolutions we could see in the coming year. We’ll get to that soon – for the moment, let’s look back a little. After all, to find out where you are going, it is better first look from whence COMEST, right?

With this in mind, computer graphics of today, entitled “mobile trends & Internet 2012”, presents a list of statistics related to the State of the Internet in 2012. The chart begins with a brief look at global internet use statistics.

China topped the charts more of Internet users, with 513 million, while the United States was a distant second with 243 million. However, States came in first place for the highest number of 3 G, with 200 million subscribers.

Some other interesting statistics for computer graphics:

953 Million Smartphone subscriptions and subscriptions there were 6.1 million mobile phones in the bloge on smartphones 2012Android send units much more for much longer after the launch. This is probably due to both the release schedule short of Apple’s products coupled with the wide range of Android on the market devices.All Apple devices, the iPad seems to be more often purchased and send piece of technology after its initial release. The iPod comes dead past.

The infographic below. As always, click it for a larger version, and see you people tomorrow.

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[Infographic]: a brief history of failures of Facebook privacy

Many of the people who say that online privacy is dead point to Facebook as an example. After all, Zuckerberg and his boys exactly have demonstrated skillful in the handling of the personal information of other people with great integrity. Facebook has a long history and failures of privacy under their belt color; one that seems to be more colorful with each passing day.

Are not all what great kindness, ironically.

Of course, the majority of Facebook users are most concerned about changes in the interface that are with where will your personal information. Hey, all gotta have priorities, right? Some people are worried about privacy; others are worried by chatting and playing Farmville. Not that I’m knocking Facebook here; more that only some mocking him.

It is, after all, as difficult to achieve without Facebook how to survive without a mobile phone. Some people still manage to pull it out, but for the rest of us; an integral part of our lives every day has become. Their integration into our personal lives is such that some more extreme psychologists (and employers) have, in a rather clumsy manner; He said that anyone who do not use the social network must be a psychopath of some kind (the fact that excessive use of Facebook has been associated with narcissism to weigh). Do at least, must be hiding something, no?

But we are diverting us from the track. Today, we have a little rather embarrassing infographic, which chronicles the failures of privacy of Facebook, flubs, cock-ups and head-scratchers. Since the recent scandal of Instagram to the abomination that the timeline is to accidentally restore people privacy settings, Facebook made some goofs rather large in years – which are thrown raw perspective when they look to the side.

Coincidentally, computer graphics also reports that Facebook is at the bottom of 230 companies in a Huffington Post customer satisfaction survey. Reasons cited concerns of privacy includes a changing product and large amounts of irrelevant advertising.

Anyway, computer graphics is below. Click for a larger version, as always.

via Mashable

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